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Quadricolor Century Plant, Agave lopthana 'Quadricolour'

Agave lophantha 'Quadricolor' (Quadricolor Century Plant) - A very distinctive and attractive small agave to 12 to 18 inches tall by 2 feet wide with 6 to 12 inch long, dark green leaves edged with yellow and having a pale green midstripe. The yellow marginal stripes, highlighted by dark reddish teeth, flush red when grown in bright light to give the leaf four distinct colors. Plant in full sun to bright filtered light (best sheltered from full summer sun in hot climates) in a well-drained soil. Tolerates dry conditions but will grow much faster with regular summer irrigation - keep drier in winter.

Quaker's-bonnet, Primula vulgaris 'Lilacina Plena'

Primula, or Primrose are plants that have the same shape and habit as the wild primrose, having individual, fragrant, flowers on a stem that, when picked, another bud grows. Primula vulgaris 'Lilacina Plena', sometimes known as 'Quaker's Bonnet', has lilac coloured, ruffled, double flowers,from late Winter.

Quaking Aspen, Populus tremuloides

Populus - poplars - are deciduous fast-growing trees that bear male and female catkins before the oval or heart-shaped leaves appear. Female catkins are fluffy seed-bearers that are wind-blown. Some poplars can grow up to 30 m. in height. The trees are useful for screening, but can also be a nuisance because of the vigorous root-system. Quaking Aspen has smooth pale bark, with black scars, and glossy green leaves, dull on the underside, that turn gold, yellow and very occasionally red in Autumn.

Quaking Grass, Briza media

Lesser quaking grass is an evergreen grass with purple tinted, green leaves. In summer locket-shaped, green-purple flowers, which fade to buff, hang from its stemms. Lovely in wildflower meadows, their flowers are excellent for drying. Height 50cm - 70cm.

Quaking Grass 'Russells', Briza media 'Russells'

Lesser quaking grass is an evergreen grass with purple tinted, green leaves. In summer locket-shaped, green-purple flowers, which fade to buff, hang from its stemms. Lovely in wildflower meadows, their flowers are excellent for drying. Height 50cm - 70cm.

Queen Anne's Lace, Daucus carota

Daucus carota, whose common names include Wild carrot, Bishop's lace, Bird's Nest, and Queen Anne's Lace, is a plant with white blooms in the Apiaceae family. They are native to temperate areas of Europe and southwest regions of Asia, and are also naturalized in North America and Australia. Although the wild carrot is similar in its appearance to the deadly poison hemlock, it has key characteristics that can be used to differentiate the two. Daucus carota is distinguished by tripinnate leaves, small thin hairs on its solid green stems and leaves, a root that smells like carrots for obvious reasons, and a single dark red flower in the center of the umbel on occasion. Like the cultivated carrot (Daucus carota ssp. sativus), the Daucus carota root can be eaten when it's still young, but it can quickly become too woody to consume. Queen Anne's Lace has a completely white tap root, rather than orange, red, or purple like cultivated carrots sometimes display. The flowers of the wild carrot are sometimes eaten after being battered and fried. The leaves can also be edible, but not in large quantities.

Queen Anne's Lace 'Dara', Daucus carota 'Dara'

Daucus carota, whose common names include Wild carrot, Bishop's lace, Bird's Nest, and Queen Anne's Lace, is a plant with white blooms in the Apiaceae family. They are native to temperate areas of Europe and southwest regions of Asia, and are also naturalized in North America and Australia. Although the wild carrot is similar in its appearance to the deadly poison hemlock, it has key characteristics that can be used to differentiate the two. Daucus carota is distinguished by tripinnate leaves, small thin hairs on its solid green stems and leaves, a root that smells like carrots for obvious reasons, and a single dark red flower in the center of the umbel on occasion. Like the cultivated carrot (Daucus carota ssp. sativus), the Daucus carota root can be eaten when it's still young, but it can quickly become too woody to consume. Queen Anne's Lace has a completely white tap root, rather than orange, red, or purple like cultivated carrots sometimes display. The flowers of the wild carrot are sometimes eaten after being battered and fried. The leaves can also be edible, but not in large quantities. 'Dara' has pink and burgundy flowers.

Queen Anne's Lace 'Purple Kisses', Daucus carota 'Purple Kisses'

Daucus carota, whose common names include Wild carrot, Bishop's lace, Bird's Nest, and Queen Anne's Lace, is a plant with white blooms in the Apiaceae family. They are native to temperate areas of Europe and southwest regions of Asia, and are also naturalized in North America and Australia. Although the wild carrot is similar in its appearance to the deadly poison hemlock, it has key characteristics that can be used to differentiate the two. Daucus carota is distinguished by tripinnate leaves, small thin hairs on its solid green stems and leaves, a root that smells like carrots for obvious reasons, and a single dark red flower in the center of the umbel on occasion. Like the cultivated carrot (Daucus carota ssp. sativus), the Daucus carota root can be eaten when it's still young, but it can quickly become too woody to consume. Queen Anne's Lace has a completely white tap root, rather than orange, red, or purple like cultivated carrots sometimes display. The flowers of the wild carrot are sometimes eaten after being battered and fried. The leaves can also be edible, but not in large quantities. 'Purple Kisses' has varying shades of chocolate, burgundy, purple and pink flowers

Queen Anne's Pocket Melon, Cucumis melo dudaim

There are numerous types of melon with many differing varieties of each. They are climbing types and low growing or ground types all require similar husbandry. The ground types tend to be the larger fruits. The climbing varieties need strong trellises for support and the fruit requires netting i.e. fruit hung in net bags tied to the trellis for support of their considerable weight. 'Queen Anne's Pocket Melon' is an apple-sized melon with fragrant white flesh. Although edible, it is somewhat tasteless, and is usually grown for it's fragrance.

Queen Anthurium, Anthurium warocqueanum

Flamingo plants are related to the Arum Lily, the leaves are glossy, wax like in appearance and heart shaped. The flowers or spadix are borne on a fleshy stem that comes up from a bract.They do not tolerate direct light, and are usually grown as a houseplant in cooler climes. Many foliage species varieties are epiphytic and grow on branches in tropical rain forests. They are usually grown in the home more for their foliage rather than flowers although some will flower. Anthurium warocqueanum is originally from Columbia and has large long, thick velvety leaves which are dark green.

Queen of the night, Selenicereus Grandiflorus syn. Cactus grandiflorus, Cereus grandiflorus

The Queen of the night blooms only one night per year and the period of blossom lasts about one week, this plant is very rare and difficult to find. The flowers have an unusual fragrance which is difficult to describe. Selenicereus grandiflorus is a cactus species originating from the Antilles, Mexico and Central America. The species is commonly referred to as queen of the night, night-blooming cereus, large-flowered cactus, sweet-scented cactus or vanilla cactus. The true species is extremely rare in cultivation. This is a very different plant from and not to be confused with the Epiphyllum oxypetalum orchid cactus "queen of the night"

Queen Victoria agave, Agave 'victoriae-reginae'

A. Victoria-reginae is a very slow growing Agave. It is one of the most beautiful and Agave species. Forms slow-growing rosettes up to 45 cm in diameter. These succulent tropical perennials are grown for their large, stiff, sword-shaped leaves arranged in tight rosettes. Flower stalks are rarely produced except on large, old plants. They can be grown from seed sown under glass in spring or propogated by planting the occasional succers during spring or summer. Plants require a minimum temperature of 7C in winter.

Queen Victoria agave, Agave victoriae-reginae 'Golden Princess'

These succulent tropical perennials are grown for their large, stiff, sword-shaped leaves arranged in tight rosettes. Flower stalks are rarely produced except on large, old plants. They can be grown from seed sown under glass in spring or propogated by planting the occasional suckers during spring or summer. Plants require a minimum temperature of 7C in winter.

Queen Victoria Agave Compact Form, Agave victoriae-reginae 'Compacta'

Agave victoriae-reginae 'Compacta' (Queen Victoria Agave) - A very slow-growing and attractive small clump-forming agave to 1 foot tall by 1 1/2 feet wide with tight-fitting, tapered deep green leaves that are edged in white along the margins and end in a small terminal spine; the leaf margins are smooth and spineless. When the plant flowers, which only happens with considerable age, the unbranched spike can reach to 15 feet and bears densely packed reddish-purple flowers. After flowering this species usually does not offset and will have to be replaced. Plant in full sun or light shade. Drought tolerant. Hardy to at least 10 F°.

Queensland Firewheel Tree, Stenocarpus sinuatus

Stenocarpus sinuatus - Firewheel Tree - is a medium to large Australian rainforest tree. It has irregular grey-brown bark, simple or pinnate wavy-edged, veined, 12-20 cm. leaves, and umbels of bright red pinwheel flowers which are followed by a boat-shaped fruit, which is a follicle, 5-10 cm. long. The 'Queensland Firewheel Tree' is a smaller tree

Queensland umbrella tree, Schefflera actinophylla

Schefflera arboricola, or Umbrella tree, is a native of South East Asia. It is evergreen, with palmate leaves and small umbels of flowers.Grown as an indoor pot-plant in cooler climes. Schefflera actinophylla, which has been awarded the RHS Award of Garden Merit, has bright red spikes of flowers in Summer and early Autumn.

Quehla chin cactus, Gymnocalycium quehlianum

Gymnocalycium is commonly called chin cactus. It is a genus of about 70 South American species of cactus. Gymnocalycium are easy plants to grow and will do well if potted on regularly every two or three years. Flowers are generally brightly coloured. Where temperatures fall below 10C, they must be cultivated under glass with heat.

Quercus aliena, Oriental White Oak

Oiental white oak, is a medium to large deciduous oak with a spreading crown that typically grows to 12 - 20m tall. Leaves are grayish-white and turn yellow in Autumn. Unlike many other types of oaks, this species tolerates alkaline soils.

Quercus cerris, Turkey Oak

Quercus cerris, native to south-eastern Europe and Asia Minor, is a fast-growing and spreading, deciduous, tree that can grow up to 30m. It bears narrow, dark green, lobed leaves and has acorns with scaly cups.

Quercus chrysolepis, Canyon Live Oak

Quercus chrysolepis, known as 'canyon live oak', 'maul oak' 'canyon oak', or 'golden cup oak', is a North American species. Its sports leaves that are a shiny dark green, are oval to oblong, leathery and margins that are spiny toothed. . It can grow to around 30m tall and in dry, open habitats, it will also grow in a shrubby growth form.

Quercus coccinea, Scarlet Oak

Scarlet oak leaves are bright green, medium sized, with deep lobes. In autumn it produces a spectacular display of bright red autumn scarlet’s, from the top to the bottom of the tree. The acorns are produced in almost closed cups.

Quercus ilex, Holm Oak

Quercus Ilex - 'Holm Oak - is a Mediterranean large evergreen tree with a rounded crown, in the oak family. It has black bark that is finely cracked, and whiteish young foliage that becomes dark green with whiteish underside, and yellow catkins.

Quercus imbricaria, Shingle Oak

Quercus imbricaria - Shingle Oak - is a medium sized tree, native to North America. It is distinguished from most species of oak by its laurel-shaped leaves, which are 8 - 20 cm long and 1.5 - 7.5 cm wide, with untoothed margins. The leaves are bright green hue, with slightly downy, paler undersides. The bark is smooth and grey to greyish-brown.The fruit are 9-18 cm. acorns, with a shallow cup, that become mature about a year and a half after pollination occurs. They are an important food for local wildlife, such as deer, birds, and some and rodents.

Quercus kelloggii, California Black Oak

Quercus kelloggii, the California black oak, also known as Kellogg oak, is an oak in the red oak section (genus Quercus, section Lobatae, series Agrifoliae), native to western North America. Although genetically separated from them for more than 20 million years its leaves (though not its fruit) are remarkably similar in appearance to several other members of the red oak section including the red oak (Quercus rubra) and the black oak (Quercus velutina) found in eastern and central North America.

Quercus palustris, Pin Oak

The Pin Oak grows to around 20m in height. A 10-year-old tree grown in full sun will be about 8 metres. It has unusual foliage which is deeply cut with pointed lobes. In the autumn it turns to fiery russets, reds and oranges. An unusual feature is that young trees often retain their foliage year round. This species can tolerate wet soil.

Quercus phellos, Willow Oak

A handsome oak with willow-like leaves. Foliage is light to bright green in summer and yellow, yellow-brown and russet in fall. Relatively fast-growing, it tolerates poorly drained soil. Prefers acid soil and full sun. Grows to 40'-60' with a 35' spread. (Zones 5-9)

Quercus phillyraeoides, Japanese Ubamegash Oak

Ubamegash Oak has evergreen leaves which are glossy, emerald green and oval shaped with smooth edges. Their undersides are pale green; new leaves emerge with a bronzy red tone. It is a small rounded tree or large spreading shrub. It needs full sun to partial shade in a moist, well-draining acidy soil that is fertile and deep. Is suitable for bonsai.

Quercus robur 'fastigiata Koster' ; syn. Quercus robur 'Kosteri Fastigiata', Oak Tree 'Koster'

Oak 'Koster' is a columnar shaped oak which becomes narrowly pyramidal with age. It is ideal for urban planting, especially when you have limited space. It is long-lived. Excellent choice for formal avenues, tall hedging or a garden focal point.

Quercus robur syn. Quercus pedunculata, English Oak

Quercus robur - oak tree- is a large deciduous tree which develops a majestic, broad crown. The leaves turn reddish-brown in Autumn. This is a long-lived British native tree

Quercus rubra, Red Oak

Original:A large deciduous and fast growing Oak with stunning red foliage in the Autumn. It prefers good soil that is slightly acidic. It is fast-growing. New:Quercus robur - oak tree- is a large deciduous tree which develops a majestic, broad crown. The leaves turn reddish-brown in Autumn. This is a long-lived British native tree

Quercus suber, Cork Oak

Quercus suber - Cork Oak - is a native of the rwestern Mediterranean and north Africa. It is a medium sized deciduous oak tree, with green leaves, 4-7 cm long, with spiny-ended lobes, acorns in Autumn, and the bark of which becomes thick and corky in a mature tree.

Quercus virginiana, Southern Live Oak

Live oaks drop their leaves immediately before new leaves emerge in the spring thus they are not true evergreens. They may drop leaf sooner in marginal climates or in dry or cold winters. Typical open-grown trees can reach 20m in height, with a spread of nearly 27m. It produces small acorns.

Quesnelia 'Tim Plowman', Bromeliad 'Tim Plowman'

Quesnelia 'Tim Plowman' is a popular cultivar of Q. marmorata. It is known for its tall, upright leaves that curl at the top. The thick leaves are green with reddish-purple spots on the inner and outer sides of the leaves. A mild wash of silver is evident giving it an overall pale green appearance. The inflorescence is branched on a tall spike with pink bracts and blue flowers. Absolutely beautiful! Looks even better in a nice pot with multiples. Do not overwater this Quesnelia and make sure it is not in wet or soggy soil or curls will straighten. Bromeliads are a family of monocot flowering plants with over 3,000 species in over 50 genera. Each species will appear in this encyclopedia with its' Genus name. The diverse family includes Epiphytes, such as tillandsia and terrestrial species such as ananus (pineapple)

Quick Fire Hydrangea, Hydrangea paniculata 'Quick Fire'

Blooms up to a month earlier than other hydrangeas! White flowers change to pink. Blooms every year. Easy to grow. A very hardy flowering shrub good for full sun locations. Perfect for a mixed container. Good for a screen or a hedge.

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