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Pink Earth Star in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Cryptanthus Bivittatus

 

Pink Earth Star

Cryptanthus bivittatus, (commonly known as Earth Star) is a small, terrestrial Bromeliad. Growing to a maximum of 20cm high and preferring moderate or diffuse light. It is commonly used in terrariums and novelty planters. Unlike many other bromeliads, they grow in the soil.

 
plant Features
  • Pink Earth Star likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Pink Earth Star likes very little water

    Very little water

  • Pink Earth Star is a little frost hardy: 32f (0°c)

    A little frost hardy: 32F (0°C)

  • Pink Earth Star likes moist and rich

    Moist and rich

 
plant information

Common name

Pink Earth Star

Latin name

Cryptanthus Bivittatus

type

Flowering plant

family

Bromeliaceae

ph

5.0 - 7.0 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    Pink Earth Star likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Frost

    Pink Earth Star is a little frost hardy: 32f (0°c)

    A little frost hardy: 32F (0°C)

  • Soil

    Pink Earth Star likes moist and rich

    Moist and rich

  • Water

    Pink Earth Star likes very little water

    Very little water

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown Pink Earth Star is 2.00meters x 0.15meters 2.00 M 0.15 M

Cryptanthus Bivittatus

Cryptanthus bivittatus, (commonly known as Earth Star) is a small, terrestrial Bromeliad. Growing to a maximum of 20cm high and preferring moderate or diffuse light. It is commonly used in terrariums and novelty planters. Unlike many other bromeliads, they grow in the soil.


Planting houseplants

From Early Spring TO Early Spring

As opposed to other bromeliads that have very small root systems which only act as anchors, Cryptanthus has a more developed root system. Its roots can be expected to grow to at least the same width as its foliage. While their root systems are larger. a five or six inch pot should still provide adequate space for the plant to grow. Using plastic pots will help maintain moisture. It is wise to use a pot that is wider than it is deep. Earth Stars will thrive when potted in a medium that maintains some moisture. Specialty potting mixes are available at garden centers and nurseries. You can also mix your own with sand, peat and perlite.

 

Planting out

From Early Spring TO Early Spring

Cryptanthus are adapted to survive under the cover of trees in humid climates. Too much direct sun can cause bleached or sunburned areas on the plant’s leaves. If your plant seems stressed and these marks appear, move your bromeliad to a spot with less direct sunlight. On the other hand, if your plant does not get enough light it will begin to look light green in color. Cryptanthus can survive in a wide range of temperatures but they thrive in temperatures between 60 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit. They are ideal for indoor growth but can also grow well outdoors in many moderate climates. Mulching when the weather becomes colder can protect the roots during the winter and allow the plant to produce offsets. The plant can also survive warmer temperatures, upwards of 100 degrees Fahrenheit as long as it is kept moist. Grow earth star in a well-draining moist soil that is friable with lots of organic matter; sandy ground is bes

 

Propagation by division.

From Early Spring TO Late Winter

Sometime before it dies, a healthy plant will produce pups, exact clones of the mother plant, that can be removed and then potted in their own growing medium. Depending on the variety of Cryptanthus, the pups can be found either at the end of stolons, at a leaf axis, or at the base of the plant. Pups should be allowed to grow attached until they are roughly 1/3 to 1/2 the size of the mother plant after which they can be removed and potted. You may have to stake the pup until it develops sufficient roots to hold itself up.

 
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