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Violet in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Viola

 

Violet

Wild violet is a low-growing clumping perennial. It has a dense, fibrous root system, with heart-shaped leaves and violet-blue or white flowers with five petals - two upper petals, and three lower petals.

Contributed by @jennlamaye

 
plant Features
  • Violet likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Violet likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

  • Violet is full frost hardy: 5f (-15°c)

    Full Frost Hardy: 5F (-15°C)

  • Violet likes all soil conditions

    All soil conditions

 
Similar plants are available to buy from 1 store(s) in the UK
 
plant information

Common name

Violet

Latin name

Viola

type

Herbaceous Perennials

family

Violaceae

ph

5.5 - 8.0 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    Violet likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Frost

    Violet is full frost hardy: 5f (-15°c)

    Full Frost Hardy: 5F (-15°C)

  • Soil

    Violet likes all soil conditions

    All soil conditions

  • Water

    Violet likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant
  •  
    When the plant will bloom

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown Violet is 0.50meters x 0.20meters 0.50 M 0.20 M

Viola

Wild violet is a low-growing clumping perennial. It has a dense, fibrous root system, with heart-shaped leaves and violet-blue or white flowers with five petals - two upper petals, and three lower petals.


Flowering Season

From Late Winter TO Early Spring

Flowers in shades of purple or white are borne from February to April and sometimes in Autumn.

 

Planting Season

From Early Winter TO Early Spring

Plant Violas in September, October, March or April in well drained soil and in full sun or partial shade.

 

Propagation by Seed

From Early Spring TO Mid Spring

Fill a seed tray with seed compost,water and allow to drain.Sprinkle seeds over the surface allowing roughly 25mm space between seeds and cover with a thin layer of compost. Put tray in a clear polythene bag and place on a windowsill. When seedlings show remove plastic bag.When the second pair of leaves appear on the seedlings thin out to 50mm spacing by removing the weakest looking plants. After 2 or 3 weeks and when danger of frost has passed plants can then be planted outside into required position.

 
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