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Feverfew in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Tanacetum parthenium

 

Feverfew

Feverfew is a perennial that is often grown as an annual. It has daisy-like flowers and fern-like fragrant foliage. Feverfew has many medicinal uses in the relief of pain and fever.

 
plant Features
  • Feverfew likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Feverfew likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

  • Feverfew is full frost hardy: 5f (-15°c)

    Full Frost Hardy: 5F (-15°C)

  • Feverfew likes free draining

    Free draining

 
Available to buy from 1 store(s) in the UK
 
plant information

Common name

Feverfew

Latin name

Tanacetum parthenium

type

Perennial

family

Asteraceae

ph

6.6 - 7.5 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    Feverfew likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Frost

    Feverfew is full frost hardy: 5f (-15°c)

    Full Frost Hardy: 5F (-15°C)

  • Soil

    Feverfew likes free draining

    Free draining

  • Water

    Feverfew likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown Feverfew is 0.50meters x 0.50meters 0.50 M 0.50 M

Tanacetum parthenium

Feverfew is a perennial that is often grown as an annual. It has daisy-like flowers and fern-like fragrant foliage. Feverfew has many medicinal uses in the relief of pain and fever.


Planting Season

From Early Spring TO Mid Spring

Planting out pot grown young plants into containers or in borders during early spring

 

Propagation by seed

From Early Spring TO Early Autumn

Sow Outside: Cover seed. Beginning of spring or autumn. Spacing 8 to 30 inches (10 to 75 cm). Sow Inside: Germination time: three weeks to two months. Temperature 55°F (13°C). Two months in advance. Transplant outdoors just before the expected last frost or in autumn.

 

Propagation by division.

From Early Spring TO Early Spring

Place two hand forks back-to-back near the middle of the plant. Gently push the handles back and forth so that the prongs gradually tease the plant apart. Repeat the process with each portion to divide the plant into more sections, making sure each section has a healthy bud. Discard the old, woody growth from the centre of the plant. Some fibrous-rooted perennials, form a loose crown of many stems and can be simply pulled apart by hand without damaging the plant. You can also take off separate stems growing at the edge of the plant, just make sure each portion has its own roots.

 
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