Please make sure JavaScript is enabled.
 
Samphire in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Salicornia

 

Samphire

Samphire grows naturally on salt marshes and tidal flats in many parts of the United Kingdom. One of its common names is Sea Asparagus, because Its bright green stalks somewhat resemble asparagus spears. It grows prostrate to erect, with simple or branched succulent stems that are smooth, and apparently jointed, and thrives in salty conditions. It can be grown in the garden, or on a window-sill, even. Cook as you would asparagus, and use as a vegetable (particularly good with fish) or as a garnish. The plant self-seeds - if you are not too greedy with harvesting!

Contributed by @suziegreenfingers

 
plant Features
  • Samphire likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Samphire likes frequent watering

    Frequent watering

  • Samphire is a little frost hardy: 32f (0°c)

    A little frost hardy: 32F (0°C)

  • Samphire likes light and free draining

    Light and free draining

 
Available to buy from 1 store(s) in the UK
 
plant information

Common name

Samphire

Latin name

Salicornia

type

Annual Herb

family

Amaranthaceae

ph

5.5 - 7.3 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    Samphire likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Frost

    Samphire is a little frost hardy: 32f (0°c)

    A little frost hardy: 32F (0°C)

  • Soil

    Samphire likes light and free draining

    Light and free draining

  • Water

    Samphire likes frequent watering

    Frequent watering

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant
  •  
    When to harvest

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown Samphire is 0.30meters x 0.30meters 0.30 M 0.30 M

Salicornia

Samphire grows naturally on salt marshes and tidal flats in many parts of the United Kingdom. One of its common names is Sea Asparagus, because Its bright green stalks somewhat resemble asparagus spears. It grows prostrate to erect, with simple or branched succulent stems that are smooth, and apparently jointed, and thrives in salty conditions. It can be grown in the garden, or on a window-sill, even. Cook as you would asparagus, and use as a vegetable (particularly good with fish) or as a garnish. The plant self-seeds - if you are not too greedy with harvesting!


Propagating by seed

From Early Spring TO Late Spring

Sow seeds in trays between from early Spring to late Spring. Germination can be slow and erratic, and can take from 5-20 days. Maintain a temperature of 25°C (77°F) for germination. When the seedlings have reached 2.5cm (1") in height they can be transferred to a pot. Use a free-draining compost. Samphire can be grown in pots indoors on a windowsill, in pots on the patio or in a sheltered site in the garden.

 

Planting

From Mid Spring TO Late Spring

If planting samphire in the garden, plant in light, free-draining, moist, slightly acidic or neutral soil, in a sunny, or partially sunny, sheltered site. Plant after last frost

 
Subscribe to GardenTags Premium to get personalised planting tasks and more for your entire plant collection
 
Gardeners who are growing this plant
>