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New Zealand flax in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Phormium tenax

 

New Zealand flax

Phormium are evergreen perennials, making a large clump of leathery, strap-shaped leaves, with tall panicles of small, tubular flowers in summer. A good architectural plant

 
plant Features
  • New Zealand flax likes full sun

    Full sun

  • New Zealand flax likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

  • New Zealand flax is a little frost hardy: 32f (0°c)

    A little frost hardy: 32F (0°C)

  • New Zealand flax likes moist and free draining

    Moist and free draining

 
Similar plants are available to buy from 2 store(s) in the UK
 
plant information

Common name

New Zealand flax

Latin name

Phormium tenax

type

Perennial

family

Asphodelaceae

ph

6.0 - 8.0 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    New Zealand flax likes full sun

    Full sun

  • Frost

    New Zealand flax is a little frost hardy: 32f (0°c)

    A little frost hardy: 32F (0°C)

  • Soil

    New Zealand flax likes moist and free draining

    Moist and free draining

  • Water

    New Zealand flax likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown New Zealand flax is 3.00meters x 4.00meters 3.00 M 4.00 M

Phormium tenax

Phormium are evergreen perennials, making a large clump of leathery, strap-shaped leaves, with tall panicles of small, tubular flowers in summer. A good architectural plant


Planting

From Early Spring TO Early Spring

Plant in any soil as long as it can be kept moist during the warm summer months. It is best not to feed these plants as it will generate soft growth that can be killed in the winter months. If growing outdoors, offer winter protection in cold regions using horticultural fleece or bracken. If planting in containers, select pots which offer good drainage and provide a saucer that can be kept topped up with water during hot, dry spells.

 

Propagation

From Early Spring TO Early Spring

Divide in spring, making sure that each piece of root has 4-5 strong leaves. Using a fork dig up plant, try to keep the root ball as complete as possible. Split the root ball at the centre with a sharp knife or a spade. Replant the plants to the same depth as the original and keep well watered until established. Alternatively, sow seeds in spring under glass and grow on in individual pots under cover. Plant out the following spring.

 
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