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Ash tree in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Fraxinus

 

Ash tree

Fraxinus is a genus which contains 45–65 species of usually medium to large trees, mostly deciduous. Commonly called Ash trees, they are widespread across much of Europe, Asia and North America. These fast-growing trees are grown for timber and firewood because of their dense wood and short time to maturity. They also make excellent ornamental specimens and street trees in sunny areas with moist, well-drained soil.

Contributed by @clare2611

 
plant Features
  • Ash tree likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Ash tree likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

  • Ash tree is full frost hardy: 5f (-15°c)

    Full Frost Hardy: 5F (-15°C)

  • Ash tree likes moist and free draining

    Moist and free draining

 
plant information

Common name

Ash tree

Latin name

Fraxinus

type

Deciduous tree

family

Oleaceae

ph

6.0 - 7.0 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    Ash tree likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Frost

    Ash tree is full frost hardy: 5f (-15°c)

    Full Frost Hardy: 5F (-15°C)

  • Soil

    Ash tree likes moist and free draining

    Moist and free draining

  • Water

    Ash tree likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown Ash tree is 18.00meters x 20.00meters 18.00 M 20.00 M

Fraxinus

Fraxinus is a genus which contains 45–65 species of usually medium to large trees, mostly deciduous. Commonly called Ash trees, they are widespread across much of Europe, Asia and North America. These fast-growing trees are grown for timber and firewood because of their dense wood and short time to maturity. They also make excellent ornamental specimens and street trees in sunny areas with moist, well-drained soil.


Planting young plants

From Early Spring TO Late Autumn

In spring or autumn, prepare a hole deep enough to allow at least 30cm of extra depth for potting soil, and approximately twice as wide as the root ball to allow for soil mixed with nutrients. Choose a spacious area as this tree will grow to very large proportions., avoiding proximitey to walls, houses or underground service pipes and cables. Add to the hole, a substantial amount of well rotted compost to help retain moisture whilst establishing and to feed the young tree in its early life.

 
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