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Creeping Fig in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Ficus pumila

 

Creeping Fig

This plant has a creeping/vining habit and is often used in gardens as ground cover or allowed to climb up trees and walls. It is not frost-hardy. Ficus pumila is also grown as an ornamental container plant. It is fast-growing and requires little in the way of care.

Contributed by @ranster

 
plant Features
  • Creeping Fig likes partial shade

    Partial shade

  • Creeping Fig likes very little water

    Very little water

  • Creeping Fig is a little frost hardy: 32f (0°c)

    A little frost hardy: 32F (0°C)

  • Creeping Fig likes light and free draining

    Light and free draining

 
plant information

Common name

Creeping Fig

Latin name

Ficus pumila

type

Climber

family

Moraceae

ph

5.0 - 7.0 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    Creeping Fig likes partial shade

    Partial shade

  • Frost

    Creeping Fig is a little frost hardy: 32f (0°c)

    A little frost hardy: 32F (0°C)

  • Soil

    Creeping Fig likes light and free draining

    Light and free draining

  • Water

    Creeping Fig likes very little water

    Very little water

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown Creeping Fig is 3.00meters x 3.00meters 3.00 M 3.00 M

Ficus pumila

This plant has a creeping/vining habit and is often used in gardens as ground cover or allowed to climb up trees and walls. It is not frost-hardy. Ficus pumila is also grown as an ornamental container plant. It is fast-growing and requires little in the way of care.


Propogation by cuttings

From Early Spring TO Early Spring

F. pumila is easy to propagate through stem-tip cuttings. Remove stem cuttings in the early spring, when the plant begins growing again, and pot up in a sterile potting mix. Keep the container warm with high ambient humidity in a bright but not sunny location. When new growth begins to emerge, you can relocate to a more permanent container.

 

Planting young plants

From Early Spring TO Early Spring

Any good, fast-draining potting soil will likely do. Smaller plants that are grown as little specimens, such as those in topiaries, should be repotted annually, in conjunction with an aggressive trimming so the plant won't overgrow its surroundings. If you want to dwarf them, you can also root prune when you're repotting to keep the plants smaller. Topiaries should be repotted every other year, being careful not to disturb the structure of the plant.

 
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