Please make sure JavaScript is enabled.
 
Oakmoss Lichen in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Evernia prunastri

 

Oakmoss Lichen

Lichens may superficially look like mosses, and have common names that include the word "moss". Lichens can grow on almost any surface. They grow abundantly on bark, leaves, mosses, rock and on other lichens, and can be found growing in rain forests alpine regions and in temperate woodland. Oakmoss grows primarily on the trunk and branches of oak trees, but is also commonly found on the bark of other deciduous trees and conifers

Contributed by @cotehow

 
plant Features
  • Oakmoss Lichen likes partial shade

    Partial shade

  • Oakmoss Lichen likes frequent watering

    Frequent watering

  • Oakmoss Lichen is full frost hardy: 5f (-15°c)

    Full Frost Hardy: 5F (-15°C)

  • Oakmoss Lichen likes moist and rich

    Moist and rich

 
plant information

Common name

Oakmoss Lichen

Latin name

Evernia prunastri

type

Moss and lichen

family

Parmeliaceae

ph

5.0 - 8.0 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    Oakmoss Lichen likes partial shade

    Partial shade

  • Frost

    Oakmoss Lichen is full frost hardy: 5f (-15°c)

    Full Frost Hardy: 5F (-15°C)

  • Soil

    Oakmoss Lichen likes moist and rich

    Moist and rich

  • Water

    Oakmoss Lichen likes frequent watering

    Frequent watering

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown Oakmoss Lichen is 0.05meters x 0.01meters 0.05 M 0.01 M

Evernia prunastri

Lichens may superficially look like mosses, and have common names that include the word "moss". Lichens can grow on almost any surface. They grow abundantly on bark, leaves, mosses, rock and on other lichens, and can be found growing in rain forests alpine regions and in temperate woodland. Oakmoss grows primarily on the trunk and branches of oak trees, but is also commonly found on the bark of other deciduous trees and conifers


Planting out

From Early Spring TO Early Spring

It is not possible to grow lichen at home and samples are often collected out in the field from rock faces, from tree bark, decaying forestry even from graveyards. However, samples are unlikely to flourish unless the growing conditions from whence they came can be mirrored exactly and even then, their survival is rare.

 
Subscribe to GardenTags Premium to get personalised planting tasks and more for your entire plant collection
 
Gardeners who are growing this plant
>