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Crucifix Orchid in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Epidendrum ibaguense

 

Crucifix Orchid

Epidendrums have reed-like stems. The inflorescences are long and produce bunches of flowers in shades of orange, red, yellow, lavender, or fuchsia. Most epidendrum blooms have a three-lobed lip at the bottom of the flower that is fused along the centre, and often bloom several times a year. The blooms are sometimes marked with spots or streaks. Most epidendrums are epiphytic. They are native to tropical and sub-tropical areas - they would need to be grown indoors in areas that do not have these conditions. Epidendrum ibaguense grows as terrestrial or lithophytic. It is variable, large in size, growing up to 90 cm., with 10 cm long leaves. Blooms at any time of year, with clusters of small (2.4 -4cm. yellow, orange or red flowers with a yellow, fringed-edged lip

Contributed by @Sussanah

 
plant Features
  • Crucifix Orchid likes partial shade

    Partial shade

  • Crucifix Orchid likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

  • Crucifix Orchid is not frost hardy

    Not Frost hardy

  • Crucifix Orchid likes moist and free draining

    Moist and free draining

 
plant information

Common name

Crucifix Orchid

Latin name

Epidendrum ibaguense

type

Perennial

family

Orchidaceae

ph

5.0 - 8.0 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    Crucifix Orchid likes partial shade

    Partial shade

  • Frost

    Crucifix Orchid is not frost hardy

    Not Frost hardy

  • Soil

    Crucifix Orchid likes moist and free draining

    Moist and free draining

  • Water

    Crucifix Orchid likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant
  •  
    When the plant will bloom

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown Crucifix Orchid is 0.25meters x 0.90meters 0.25 M 0.90 M

Epidendrum ibaguense

Epidendrums have reed-like stems. The inflorescences are long and produce bunches of flowers in shades of orange, red, yellow, lavender, or fuchsia. Most epidendrum blooms have a three-lobed lip at the bottom of the flower that is fused along the centre, and often bloom several times a year. The blooms are sometimes marked with spots or streaks. Most epidendrums are epiphytic. They are native to tropical and sub-tropical areas - they would need to be grown indoors in areas that do not have these conditions. Epidendrum ibaguense grows as terrestrial or lithophytic. It is variable, large in size, growing up to 90 cm., with 10 cm long leaves. Blooms at any time of year, with clusters of small (2.4 -4cm. yellow, orange or red flowers with a yellow, fringed-edged lip


Flowering

From Early Spring TO Late Winter

Epidendrum produces flowers that last about three months (sometimes even longer) at any time of the year. Once the flowers have faded, cut the flowering stalk back to just above the second node (joint) visible beneath the spent flowers. A new flowering side shoot may develop.

 

Planting

From Early Spring TO Late Winter

Epidendrums are epiphytic, and so will grow with very little growing medium. They can be planted in just bark, or can be grown in orchid medium. They prefer indirect bright light, and need a temperature of over 50 deg. F. They also require moisture, and should not be allowed to dry out. Nor should they be allowed to stand in water and become waterlogged

 

Propagating

From Early Spring TO Late Winter

Epidendrums are propagated by tissue culture, which is not easy to do at home, - best left to the experts!

 
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