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Echeveria Calycosa in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Echeveria Calycosa

 

Echeveria 'Calycosa'

http://www.crassulaceae.ch/de/artikel?akID=48&aaID=2&aiID=C&aID=1188 Type : Moran 13424. Etymology : Referring to the conspicuous calyx. Distribution : Mexico (Michoacán, 9 km south of Uruapan), growing in lichens on shaded vertical rocks at about 1'200 m. First Description by Reid Moran in Cactus and Succulent Journal US 39(1), 14-16. 1967 : Plant glabrous. Caudex 0.5 - 1.5 cm thick, rarely 4 cm long, unbranched except apparently after injury. Rosettes rather flat,5 - 10 (-15) cm wide, of 15 - 25 close-set leaves. Rosette leaves light green, spatulate, rounded at the apex and weakly mucronate, 2.5 - 5 (-9) cm long, 1.5 - 2.5 (-3.5) cm wide above, 4 - 10 mm wide at the base, with one main vein branching shortly above the base and with usually two strong lateral veins entering separately, the margins acute, narrowly hyaline, entire, the mucro downturned and inconspicuous. Floral stems at first nodding, becoming erect or ascending, green throughout or pink above, 5 - 20 cm tall (to the inflorescence), 1.5 - 3 (-5) mm thick at the base, bare in the lower 1 - 8 cm, with 4 - 11 ascending leaves above, the old stems often persisting firmly attached for several seasons. Stem leaves elliptic to oblanceolate, acute, short-spurred, scarcely reduced upward, 10 - 28 mm long, 3 - 8 mm wide, 2 - 3 mm thick. Cincinni mostly solitary, occasionally 2, rarely 3, circinate becoming erect, 2 - 21 cm long, with 5 - 38 flowers, the flowers opening at intervals of ca 3 days, at first pointing downward at ca 45°, rising to horizontal during anthesis, the bracts imbricated at first, elliptic, acute, sagittate-clasping, 7 - 15 mm long, 3 -6 mm wide, ca 1 mm thick. Pedicels pink, 2 - 5 mm long, 0.75 - 1.5 mm thick. Flowers : Calyx pink at the base, light green above, the disk umbilicate, 3 - 5 mm wide, the segments ascending, markedly unequal, commonly the three upper ones about equal and the two lower much smaller but sometimes, even in the same inflorescence, four nearly equal and one much smaller or two larger and three much smaller, the upper laterals largest, oblong-lanceolate, acute, 9 - 13 mm long, 2 - 4.5 mm wide, the upper (middle) 3 - 11 mm long, 1 - 3 mm wide, the two lower triangular-acuminate, 2 - 10 mm long, 1 - 2 mm wide, the lower inner smallest. Corolla yellow above, suffused below with pink and thus appearing orangish below, pentagonal with flattened sides, 7.5 - 10 mm long, 4 - 6 mm wide at the base, 3 - 7 mm wide at the apex. Petals connate less than 0.5 mm, valvate, triangular-lanceolate, narrow-acute, ca 2.5 mm wide, obtusely keeled dorsally, broadly channeled ventrally, the nectar pit 1.5 - 2 mm from the base, somewhat flattened below, 0.5 - 0.6 mm wide. Anthers yellow...... Flowering time : July and August.

Contributed by @gardentagssucculentexpert

 
plant Features
  • Echeveria Calycosa likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Echeveria Calycosa likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

  • Echeveria Calycosa is a little frost hardy: 32f (0°c)

    A little frost hardy: 32F (0°C)

  • Echeveria Calycosa likes free draining and fertile

    Free draining and fertile

 
plant information

Common name

Echeveria 'Calycosa'

Latin name

Echeveria Calycosa

type

Succulent

family

Crassulaceae

ph

5.5 - 6.0 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    Echeveria Calycosa likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Frost

    Echeveria Calycosa is a little frost hardy: 32f (0°c)

    A little frost hardy: 32F (0°C)

  • Soil

    Echeveria Calycosa likes free draining and fertile

    Free draining and fertile

  • Water

    Echeveria Calycosa likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant
  •  
    When the plant will bloom

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown Echeveria Calycosa is 0.20meters x 0.20meters 0.20 M 0.20 M

Echeveria Calycosa

http://www.crassulaceae.ch/de/artikel?akID=48&aaID=2&aiID=C&aID=1188 Type : Moran 13424. Etymology : Referring to the conspicuous calyx. Distribution : Mexico (Michoacán, 9 km south of Uruapan), growing in lichens on shaded vertical rocks at about 1'200 m. First Description by Reid Moran in Cactus and Succulent Journal US 39(1), 14-16. 1967 : Plant glabrous. Caudex 0.5 - 1.5 cm thick, rarely 4 cm long, unbranched except apparently after injury. Rosettes rather flat,5 - 10 (-15) cm wide, of 15 - 25 close-set leaves. Rosette leaves light green, spatulate, rounded at the apex and weakly mucronate, 2.5 - 5 (-9) cm long, 1.5 - 2.5 (-3.5) cm wide above, 4 - 10 mm wide at the base, with one main vein branching shortly above the base and with usually two strong lateral veins entering separately, the margins acute, narrowly hyaline, entire, the mucro downturned and inconspicuous. Floral stems at first nodding, becoming erect or ascending, green throughout or pink above, 5 - 20 cm tall (to the inflorescence), 1.5 - 3 (-5) mm thick at the base, bare in the lower 1 - 8 cm, with 4 - 11 ascending leaves above, the old stems often persisting firmly attached for several seasons. Stem leaves elliptic to oblanceolate, acute, short-spurred, scarcely reduced upward, 10 - 28 mm long, 3 - 8 mm wide, 2 - 3 mm thick. Cincinni mostly solitary, occasionally 2, rarely 3, circinate becoming erect, 2 - 21 cm long, with 5 - 38 flowers, the flowers opening at intervals of ca 3 days, at first pointing downward at ca 45°, rising to horizontal during anthesis, the bracts imbricated at first, elliptic, acute, sagittate-clasping, 7 - 15 mm long, 3 -6 mm wide, ca 1 mm thick. Pedicels pink, 2 - 5 mm long, 0.75 - 1.5 mm thick. Flowers : Calyx pink at the base, light green above, the disk umbilicate, 3 - 5 mm wide, the segments ascending, markedly unequal, commonly the three upper ones about equal and the two lower much smaller but sometimes, even in the same inflorescence, four nearly equal and one much smaller or two larger and three much smaller, the upper laterals largest, oblong-lanceolate, acute, 9 - 13 mm long, 2 - 4.5 mm wide, the upper (middle) 3 - 11 mm long, 1 - 3 mm wide, the two lower triangular-acuminate, 2 - 10 mm long, 1 - 2 mm wide, the lower inner smallest. Corolla yellow above, suffused below with pink and thus appearing orangish below, pentagonal with flattened sides, 7.5 - 10 mm long, 4 - 6 mm wide at the base, 3 - 7 mm wide at the apex. Petals connate less than 0.5 mm, valvate, triangular-lanceolate, narrow-acute, ca 2.5 mm wide, obtusely keeled dorsally, broadly channeled ventrally, the nectar pit 1.5 - 2 mm from the base, somewhat flattened below, 0.5 - 0.6 mm wide. Anthers yellow...... Flowering time : July and August.


Planting

From Early Spring TO Late Winter

Echeveria can be propagated easily by separating pups, but also by leaf cuttings, and by seed. It needs a warm, sunny position with well drained soil to develop their foliage colour. It is recommended to position plants in an area where they are in part shade. This means that they should be in morning sun, or afternoon sun, or both (but shaded during the harsh midday period). Alternatively, plants may be grown under full filtered sun underneath shade cloth which is usually stocked by your local hardware store. 50% filtration is recommended to avoid sunburn but maintain great colour. You may need to test what works well in your particular climate. Most succulents will be grown in containers and pots and they will need good drainage medium. Add coarse grit such as perlite or pumice to soil and repot every year in late-spring. Don't worry about damaging the roots when re-potting as most Echeveria generally tolerate disturbance well.

 

Flowering

From Early Spring TO Late Winter

Echeveria could flower a number of times through the year. Flowering can use much of the plant’s energy, therefore it’s recommended that flower stalks are removed from sick or weaker plants until they are well established. If your plant is healthy, enjoy it’s beautiful show of blooms. Flowers on short stalks (cymes) arise from compact rosettes of succulent's fleshy, often brightly coloured leaves. Species are polycarpic, meaning that they may flower and set seed many times over the course of their lifetimes and indeed a number of times per year.

 

Propagating

From Early Spring TO Late Winter

Pluck a leaf gently from the stem taking care not to damage the leaf. It should have a u-shape if plucked correctly. Leave the leaf for a few days to callous over. Once this has happened, place the leaf on top of your propagation medium of choice with the u-shaped end downward, rest the leaf on a bamboo stick or similar at a 45 degree angle to the propagation medium. Propagation is best done in indirect light, not in direct sunlight. Alternatively, a grow light can be used. Roots should sprout in two to four weeks, followed by new tiny leaves. At this point, depending on the humidity and rainfall in your area, you may mist or lightly water your leaves as the plant grows. Resist the urge to remove the mother leaf once it becomes dried up and shrivelled. It’s best for this process to occur naturally.

 
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