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Black-twig Dogwood in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Cornus alba 'Kesselringii'

 

Black-twig Dogwood

Cornus is commonly known as dogwood, the varieties of which can be distinguished by their blossoms, berries, and bark. They are deciduous trees or shrubs, but a few species are perennial sub-shrubs, and some of the woody types are evergreen. Several varieties produce inconspicuous flowers. This cultivar of Cornus alba grown for its shiny deep purple-black stems. New spring foliage is flushed in inky purple. In autumn its leaves turn gold, apricot, and rose-red.

Contributed by @franshinegee

 
plant Features
  • Black-twig Dogwood likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Black-twig Dogwood likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

  • Black-twig Dogwood is full frost hardy: 5f (-15°c)

    Full Frost Hardy: 5F (-15°C)

  • Black-twig Dogwood likes moist and free draining

    Moist and free draining

 
Available to buy from 1 store(s) in the UK
 
plant information

Common name

Black-twig Dogwood

Latin name

Cornus alba 'Kesselringii'

type

Trees or Shrubs

family

Cornaceae

ph

5.0 - 8.0 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    Black-twig Dogwood likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Frost

    Black-twig Dogwood is full frost hardy: 5f (-15°c)

    Full Frost Hardy: 5F (-15°C)

  • Soil

    Black-twig Dogwood likes moist and free draining

    Moist and free draining

  • Water

    Black-twig Dogwood likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown Black-twig Dogwood is 2.00meters x 2.00meters 2.00 M 2.00 M

Cornus alba 'Kesselringii'

Cornus is commonly known as dogwood, the varieties of which can be distinguished by their blossoms, berries, and bark. They are deciduous trees or shrubs, but a few species are perennial sub-shrubs, and some of the woody types are evergreen. Several varieties produce inconspicuous flowers. This cultivar of Cornus alba grown for its shiny deep purple-black stems. New spring foliage is flushed in inky purple. In autumn its leaves turn gold, apricot, and rose-red.


Planting

From Late Winter TO Early Spring

Shrubby dogwoods grown for their winter stem colour (Cornus alba, C. sericea and C. sanguinea cvs.) are unfussy about their soil conditions, but they are able to thrive in damp conditions where other shrubs might fail. C. controversa (the wedding cake tree), C. alternifolia (the pagoda dogwood), C. mas (the cornelian cherry) and C. officinalis are also tolerant of a range of soil conditions. Flowering dogwoods Cornus florida, C. kousa, C. capitata and C. nuttallii do best in well-drained but fertile soil that is rich in organic matter and neutral to acid in pH. C. kousa (from Korea and Japan), is more tolerant of neutral to alkaline conditions than are the North American species C. florida and C. nuttallii. All Cornus species will tolerate full sun or partial shade, but those grown for their winter stem colour show better colour when grown in full sun.

 

Propagation

From Mid Spring TO Early Summer

Species plants can be propagated from seed, but named cultivars will not come true to type from seed and are better propagated from hardwood or greenwood cuttings. Variegated cultivars of C. controversa (the wedding cake tree) and C. alternifolia (the pagoda dogwood) are usually grafted commercially in winter, but may also be propagated at home from cuttings.

 
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