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Reverse Variegated Spider Plant in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Chlorophytum comosum 'Variegatum'

 

Reverse Variegated Spider Plant

The spider plant has been grown indoors for many years and is one of the most common houseplants. It grows quickly, sports arching leaves and in spring and summer, the trailing stems produce small white flowers followed by tiny plantlets. These grow to form an attractive display, especially in a hanging basket. Removed from the mother plant, they can be used to produce new plants once rooted.

Contributed by @katebou

 
plant Features
  • Reverse Variegated Spider Plant likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Reverse Variegated Spider Plant likes very little water

    Very little water

  • Reverse Variegated Spider Plant is not frost hardy

    Not Frost hardy

  • Reverse Variegated Spider Plant likes moist and free draining

    Moist and free draining

 
Available to buy from 1 store(s) in the UK
 
plant information

Common name

Reverse Variegated Spider Plant

Latin name

Chlorophytum comosum 'Variegatum'

type

Perennial

family

Asparagaceae

ph

5.0 - 7.5 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    Reverse Variegated Spider Plant likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Frost

    Reverse Variegated Spider Plant is not frost hardy

    Not Frost hardy

  • Soil

    Reverse Variegated Spider Plant likes moist and free draining

    Moist and free draining

  • Water

    Reverse Variegated Spider Plant likes very little water

    Very little water

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown Reverse Variegated Spider Plant is 0.40meters x 0.30meters 0.40 M 0.30 M

Chlorophytum comosum 'Variegatum'

The spider plant has been grown indoors for many years and is one of the most common houseplants. It grows quickly, sports arching leaves and in spring and summer, the trailing stems produce small white flowers followed by tiny plantlets. These grow to form an attractive display, especially in a hanging basket. Removed from the mother plant, they can be used to produce new plants once rooted.


Planting

From Early Spring TO Late Summer

To take baby plants from the mother plant, set a small pot filled with damp potting mix next to the plant. Sink a new plantlet into the soil of the small pot, so that the root buds are barely covered. You may need to use a bent paperclip to hold the plantlet in place. It should root in 2-3 weeks. After that time, sever it from the parent plant.

 

Propagation

From Early Spring TO Late Summer

The plantlets growing on wiry stems from the mother plant - often called "babies" - are easy to propagate, giving you an ongoing supply of plants. For sure success, choose young, small plantlets for propagating because the larger plantlets are older and will root slowly.

 
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Gardeners who are growing this plant