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Bamboo Begonia Tamaya in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Begonia Maculata 'Tamaya'

 

Bamboo Begonia 'Tamaya'

Rhizomatous Begonias have a thickened stem called the rhizome which develops on or just below the surface of the soil. Roots, leaf stalks and flowerheads all sprout directly from the rhizome. They make fine foliage plants. They are not hardy and are grown as flowering specimens for the home, conservatory or greenhouse. Some rhizomatous begonias (particularly Begonia Rex) are grown for their interesting foliage, varied in colour and pattern. The majority being shades of green, black, silver and brown. Many also have interesting ruffled edges. Some cultivars of rhizomatous begonias are good for growing in containers and hanging-baskets.The Begonia 'Tamaya' has spotted leaves and has pink flowers throughout the year.

 
plant Features
  • Bamboo Begonia Tamaya likes partial shade

    Partial shade

  • Bamboo Begonia Tamaya likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

  • Bamboo Begonia Tamaya is not frost hardy

    Not Frost hardy

  • Bamboo Begonia Tamaya likes moist and free draining

    Moist and free draining

 
plant information

Common name

Bamboo Begonia 'Tamaya'

Latin name

Begonia Maculata 'Tamaya'

type

Houseplant

family

Begoniaceae

ph

5.5 - 7.5 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    Bamboo Begonia Tamaya likes partial shade

    Partial shade

  • Frost

    Bamboo Begonia Tamaya is not frost hardy

    Not Frost hardy

  • Soil

    Bamboo Begonia Tamaya likes moist and free draining

    Moist and free draining

  • Water

    Bamboo Begonia Tamaya likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown Bamboo Begonia Tamaya is 0.40meters x 0.60meters 0.40 M 0.60 M

Begonia Maculata 'Tamaya'

Rhizomatous Begonias have a thickened stem called the rhizome which develops on or just below the surface of the soil. Roots, leaf stalks and flowerheads all sprout directly from the rhizome. They make fine foliage plants. They are not hardy and are grown as flowering specimens for the home, conservatory or greenhouse. Some rhizomatous begonias (particularly Begonia Rex) are grown for their interesting foliage, varied in colour and pattern. The majority being shades of green, black, silver and brown. Many also have interesting ruffled edges. Some cultivars of rhizomatous begonias are good for growing in containers and hanging-baskets.The Begonia 'Tamaya' has spotted leaves and has pink flowers throughout the year.


Planting

From Early Spring TO Early Spring

All begonias do best in neutral soils or compost and most prefer to be sited in partial shade. When first planting young plants, it is worth removing any early flower buds as this will allow the plant to reach its full size as quickly as possible. Rhizomatous begonias will grow in all the various types of pots. Many can even be grown as epiphytes using various methods such as on boards with a small amount of mix covered with spagnum moss. Most rhizomatous begonias do best in shallow pots or bowls when using plastic pots. If you encounter difficulties growing this type of begonia using plastic pots, you may do better using clay azalea pots or clay bowls. These pots are more expensive and heavier but nearly all rhizomatous begonias will do well in them. Rhizomatous begonias will also do very well in wooden pots or moss covered baskets.

 

Propagation by division

From Early Spring TO Early Summer

For small rhizomatous types, divide the rhizome and use root pieces

 

Propagating by leaf cuttings

From Early Summer TO Mid Summer

A single leaf can produce several young plants. Remove a healthy leaf, and, use a clean, sharp knife, to cut it into postage-stamp sized pieces, with each piece having a vein down its length. Stand leaf pieces upright in pots of compost ensuring that the cut vein is in contact with the compost. Water, to settle the compost around the cuttings, then place the pot in a clear polythene bag, and put it in a warm, light position, until the cutting has taken root and produced shoots (this is usually several months). When large enough to handle, pot on.

 
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