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Bromeliad Aechmea Fasciata Primera in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Aechmea Fasciata Primera

 

Bromeliad Aechmea Fasciata Primera

This epiphyte is silver and green in colour and can also be variegated. The star shaped, pink flower head grows to approximately 15cm long, with small light purple flowers growing from the bracts. Unlike the A. Fasciata, the primera has a smooth leaf edge.

Contributed by @Muzz67

 
plant Features
  • Bromeliad Aechmea Fasciata Primera likes partial shade

    Partial shade

  • Bromeliad Aechmea Fasciata Primera likes very little water

    Very little water

  • Bromeliad Aechmea Fasciata Primera is not frost hardy

    Not Frost hardy

  • Bromeliad Aechmea Fasciata Primera likes rich and free draining

    Rich and free draining

 
Similar plants are available to buy from 2 store(s) in the UK
 
plant information

Common name

Bromeliad Aechmea Fasciata Primera

Latin name

Aechmea Fasciata Primera

type

Epiphyte

family

Bromeliaceae

ph

5.0 - 6.5 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    Bromeliad Aechmea Fasciata Primera likes partial shade

    Partial shade

  • Frost

    Bromeliad Aechmea Fasciata Primera is not frost hardy

    Not Frost hardy

  • Soil

    Bromeliad Aechmea Fasciata Primera likes rich and free draining

    Rich and free draining

  • Water

    Bromeliad Aechmea Fasciata Primera likes very little water

    Very little water

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown Bromeliad Aechmea Fasciata Primera is 0.80meters x 1.00meters 0.80 M 1.00 M

Aechmea Fasciata Primera

This epiphyte is silver and green in colour and can also be variegated. The star shaped, pink flower head grows to approximately 15cm long, with small light purple flowers growing from the bracts. Unlike the A. Fasciata, the primera has a smooth leaf edge.


Planting

From Early Spring TO Mid Summer

Pots and potting media can directly affect the moisture levels in the bromeliad. Plastic pots tend to hold moisture for a longer period of time. If you are in an arid region or raising your bromeliad in a heated home, you may want to consider a plastic container to house your plant in. Un-glazed clay pots are porous and allow water to seep out. If you are living in a very humid area, you may want to consider this type of container so your plant doesn’t stay overly wet. You will want to make sure that there is some sort of saucer or pad underneath to catch the seeping water otherwise you could end up damaging the the floor or furniture the pot sits on. Regardless the type of container, never use soil when potting your bromeliad. It is too dense and will not allow for the quick drainage that bromeliads require. Instead, use potting mixes specially formulated for bromeliads or mix your own using porous materials.

 

Propagation

From Early Spring TO Late Summer

These are pretty easy to propagate, the main plant will send out small off sets around its base, when these have developed small roots they can be cut off and potted up.

 
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Gardeners who are growing this plant