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African Violet in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Saintpaulia

 

African Violet

Saintpaulias, or African Violets, have round to oval leaves that are finely hairy and slightly fleshy, usually dark green. The flowers grow in clusters, and have five-lobed velvety petals. They are often grown a houseplants, but can also be grown outdoors.

Contributed by @Tfray77

 
plant Features
  • African Violet likes partial shade

    Partial shade

  • African Violet likes very little water

    Very little water

  • African Violet is not frost hardy

    Not Frost hardy

  • African Violet likes light and free draining

    Light and free draining

 
Similar plants are available to buy from 1 store(s) in the UK
 
plant information

Common name

African Violet

Latin name

Saintpaulia

type

Houseplant

family

Gesneriaceae

ph

5.8 - 6.2 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    African Violet likes partial shade

    Partial shade

  • Frost

    African Violet is not frost hardy

    Not Frost hardy

  • Soil

    African Violet likes light and free draining

    Light and free draining

  • Water

    African Violet likes very little water

    Very little water

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown African Violet is 0.15meters x 0.10meters 0.15 M 0.10 M

Saintpaulia

Saintpaulias, or African Violets, have round to oval leaves that are finely hairy and slightly fleshy, usually dark green. The flowers grow in clusters, and have five-lobed velvety petals. They are often grown a houseplants, but can also be grown outdoors.


Potting African Violets

From Early Spring TO Early Spring

The soil for growing African violets must be porous to allow surplus water to pass through readily. Most violets are now grown in pasteurised soilless mixes. A good soilless mix is made up of 3 parts sphagnum peat moss, 2 parts vermiculite and 1 part perlite, with some lime added to balance the acidity of the peat moss. A good growing medium should contain 50 percent medium, 25 percent air and 25 percent water. When potting African violets, take care to set the plant so that the crown is just above the surface and the soil is firmly pressed around it. Emphasis should be on good soil drainage because free water on the surface may cause decay at the crown or at the bases of the leaf stalks. African violets adjust well to the warm temperatures and dry air of homes.

 

Propagation by cuttings

From Early Spring TO Early Summer

Cut off a leaf with a sharp and clean knife. The African Violet cutting can be planted in a regular potting soil or a mix between humus and sand (3:1). The ending of the leave should sit on the ground. Put it on a bright but not sunny place with a temperature > 20 °C (68 °F). Keep the soil moist but not wet. A fertiliser must not be given. There is also no need to increase humidity. After 6 to 8 weeks the African Violet cuttings will show first new leaves. After about 6 months they can be treated like the mother plant.

 
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