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Nerine in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Nerine

 

Nerine

Nerines are Autumn-flowering bulbs. They have strap-like leaves, often appearing after the flowers. The flowers have 6 narrow, recurved petals and prominent stamens. Some nerines are hardy (such as Nerine bowdenii), and others are tender (such as Nerine sarniensis) which are more suitable for growing indoors, or in a conservatory, in cooler climates. Foliage growth will also vary. Nerine bowdenii (and it's cultivars) will produce foliage in the spring, and flowers in the autumn as foliage is dying back or about to die back. Whereas for Nerine sarniensis will produce flowers first in the autumn, followed by foliage over winter. All nerines should be planted so that their necks are exposed to the sun to ensure baking and successful flowering. They also resent being moved so only divide or repot nerines when absolutely necessary. Crowded bulbs often encourages flowering.

Contributed by @Dinglebell

 
plant Features
  • Nerine likes full sun

    Full sun

  • Nerine likes very little water

    Very little water

  • Nerine is frost hardy: 23f (-5°c)

    Frost Hardy: 23F (-5°C)

  • Nerine likes light and free draining

    Light and free draining

 
plant information

Common name

Nerine

Latin name

Nerine

type

Bulb

family

Amaryllidaceae

ph

5.5 - 7.0 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    Nerine likes full sun

    Full sun

  • Frost

    Nerine is frost hardy: 23f (-5°c)

    Frost Hardy: 23F (-5°C)

  • Soil

    Nerine likes light and free draining

    Light and free draining

  • Water

    Nerine likes very little water

    Very little water

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant
  •  
    When the plant will bloom

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown Nerine is 0.10meters x 0.45meters 0.10 M 0.45 M

Nerine

Nerines are Autumn-flowering bulbs. They have strap-like leaves, often appearing after the flowers. The flowers have 6 narrow, recurved petals and prominent stamens. Some nerines are hardy (such as Nerine bowdenii), and others are tender (such as Nerine sarniensis) which are more suitable for growing indoors, or in a conservatory, in cooler climates. Foliage growth will also vary. Nerine bowdenii (and it's cultivars) will produce foliage in the spring, and flowers in the autumn as foliage is dying back or about to die back. Whereas for Nerine sarniensis will produce flowers first in the autumn, followed by foliage over winter. All nerines should be planted so that their necks are exposed to the sun to ensure baking and successful flowering. They also resent being moved so only divide or repot nerines when absolutely necessary. Crowded bulbs often encourages flowering.


Planting Bulbs in Spring (Nerine bowdenii)

From Early Spring TO Early Spring

For Nerine bowdenii and its cultivars, which begin grown in spring and flower in the autumn, plant your bulbs as soon as they arrive each one into a 9cm pot filled with a mixture of 50% multipurpose compost and 50% loam based potting compost, such as John Innes No 2. When planting, make sure that the roots are spread out and only the bottom half of the bulbs are below the compost level. The top half of the bulb (the neck) must remain above it. Wait until the roots fill the pot before planting out into the garden, at the same level. Resist repotting regularly as Nerines dislike disturbance. Alternatively, Nerines make good pot plants and can be planted in shallow terracotta pans. Ensure it is a shallow pot and plant in the same where as for the ground, with the neck of the bulb exposed.

 

Flowering Season

From Early Autumn TO Late Autumn

Nerines typically flower in the autumn period. For Nerine bowdenii and its cultivars, flowering usually occurs in the autumn as foliage begins to die back after it has been growing all summer. Whereas for Nerine sarniensis and its cultivars, flowering usually occurs also in the autumn but before foliage growth starts.

 

Planting Bulbs in Autumn (Nerine sarniensis)

From Mid Autumn TO Mid Autumn

For Nerine sarnienis, and its cultivars, these are winter growing and should be planted in the autumn and for warmer climates or under cover in a heated glasshouse only. Plant your bulbs as soon as they arrive each one into a 9cm pot filled with a mixture of 50% multipurpose compost and 50% loam based potting compost, such as John Innes No 2. When planting, make sure that the roots are spread out and only the bottom half of the bulbs are below the compost level. The top half of the bulb (the neck) must remain above it. Wait until the roots fill the pot before planting out into the garden, at the same level. Resist repotting regularly as Nerines dislike disturbance. Alternatively, Nerines make good pot plants and can be planted in shallow terracotta pans. Ensure it is a shallow pot and plant in the same where as for the ground, with the neck of the bulb exposed.

 

Propagation by Offsets

From Early Spring TO Mid Summer

Nerine bulbs will produce offsets over time, growing from the sides of existing bulbs. It is important to ensure the young bulbs have reached a good size before breaking them off from the parent and can be done when young bulbs are at least two thirds the size of the parent bulb. During the dormant season, before bulbs are due to come into growth (which is late winter/early spring for Nerine bowdenii and cultivars, or summer for Nerine sarniensis and cultivars) dug up and split the bulbs carefully, ensuring not to break any new roots, and replant in a suitable potting mix ensuring the young bulb is exactly the same height within the soil as it was when attached to the parent. The young neck of the bulb should be exposed above the soild.

 

Propagation by Division

From Late Autumn TO Early Winter

Divide the clumps after flowering has finished, and re-plant the divisions.

 
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