Please make sure JavaScript is enabled.
 
Echeveria Cante in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Echeveria Cante

 

Echeveria 'Cante'

http://www.crassulaceae.ch/de/artikel?akID=48&aaID=2&aiID=C&aID=1189 Series Gibbiflorae Type : Gl. 8073, Mexico, Zacatecas, collected June 19, 1994, between Sombrerete and Fresnillo. Etymology : Derived from Cante A.C., a supporting organization of Charles Glass' botanical work while he lived in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. The name "cante" is in turn derived from the Pame-Chichimeca word meaning "the water that gives life" (according to the ISI text for the offering of E. cante in 2012). Distribution : Mexico (Zacatecas). First Description by Glass & Mendoza-García in Cactus and Succulent Journal US 69(5): 239 ff, 1997 : Solitary, rosette sessile, 30 - 40 cm in diameter. Leaves several, 35 - 50 or more in large, old specimens, densely crowded, 15 - 18.5 cm long, 6.5 - 7.5 cm wide, ca 3 cm wide at base, 10 mm thick at base, 6 mm thick above, rather flat to slightly concave above, not markedly channelled, slightly convex below, without keel, basal attachment ca 24 mm wide, leaves pale bluish-green tinged lavender, highly farinose, with a milky opalescent quality, with thin-edged, narrow, pink margins, sometimes with a slight pleat or marginal fold near the apex. Inflorescence maturing in late summer, flowering stem laterally ascending, pruinose Mexican-red, usually solitary, occasionally 2 - 4, 45 - 60 cm long, ca 10 mm in diameter near the base, with about 5 branches 3 - 8 cm apart, each with 4 - 12 flowers, bracts 55, to 17 mm long, 4 - 10 mm wide, soon drying and falling, pedicels (2-) 4 - 17 mm long and 4 mm thick. Flowers ca 23 mm long, sepals 10 - 15 mm long, 7 - 9 mm wide near base, pruinose grayish lavender, curved, ascending, corolla 10 - 15 mm in diameter near the base at broadest point, petals 20 mm long, 6 - 8 mm wide, slightly keeled, pruinose orange-pink outside, curving slightly outwards with an opening of 9 - 10 mm, 5 - 7 mm in diameter at waist, inner surface yellowish. 1. Until its description in 1997 this species has been in cultivation for decades under the name Echeveria subrigida. In fact E. cante and E. subrigida cannot be confused, the leaves of the former are highly farinose (those of E. subrigida are white-pruinose or also entirely green) and its inflorescence is shorter and more branched. 2. Hybrids made prior to 1997 with E. subrigida as one parent therefore are in fact hybrids with E. cante. 3. The plant distributed as E. subrigida by ISI (no.182) in 1958 was not this species, but also E. cante.

Contributed by @gardentagssucculentexpert

 
plant Features
  • Echeveria Cante likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Echeveria Cante likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

  • Echeveria Cante is a little frost hardy: 32f (0°c)

    A little frost hardy: 32F (0°C)

  • Echeveria Cante likes free draining and fertile

    Free draining and fertile

 
Similar plants are available to buy from 3 store(s) in the UK
 
plant information

Common name

Echeveria 'Cante'

Latin name

Echeveria Cante

type

Succulent

family

Crassulaceae

ph

5.5 - 6.0 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    Echeveria Cante likes full sun to partial shade

    Full sun to partial shade

  • Frost

    Echeveria Cante is a little frost hardy: 32f (0°c)

    A little frost hardy: 32F (0°C)

  • Soil

    Echeveria Cante likes free draining and fertile

    Free draining and fertile

  • Water

    Echeveria Cante likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant
  •  
    When the plant will bloom

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown Echeveria Cante is 0.40meters x 0.30meters 0.40 M 0.30 M

Echeveria Cante

http://www.crassulaceae.ch/de/artikel?akID=48&aaID=2&aiID=C&aID=1189 Series Gibbiflorae Type : Gl. 8073, Mexico, Zacatecas, collected June 19, 1994, between Sombrerete and Fresnillo. Etymology : Derived from Cante A.C., a supporting organization of Charles Glass' botanical work while he lived in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. The name "cante" is in turn derived from the Pame-Chichimeca word meaning "the water that gives life" (according to the ISI text for the offering of E. cante in 2012). Distribution : Mexico (Zacatecas). First Description by Glass & Mendoza-García in Cactus and Succulent Journal US 69(5): 239 ff, 1997 : Solitary, rosette sessile, 30 - 40 cm in diameter. Leaves several, 35 - 50 or more in large, old specimens, densely crowded, 15 - 18.5 cm long, 6.5 - 7.5 cm wide, ca 3 cm wide at base, 10 mm thick at base, 6 mm thick above, rather flat to slightly concave above, not markedly channelled, slightly convex below, without keel, basal attachment ca 24 mm wide, leaves pale bluish-green tinged lavender, highly farinose, with a milky opalescent quality, with thin-edged, narrow, pink margins, sometimes with a slight pleat or marginal fold near the apex. Inflorescence maturing in late summer, flowering stem laterally ascending, pruinose Mexican-red, usually solitary, occasionally 2 - 4, 45 - 60 cm long, ca 10 mm in diameter near the base, with about 5 branches 3 - 8 cm apart, each with 4 - 12 flowers, bracts 55, to 17 mm long, 4 - 10 mm wide, soon drying and falling, pedicels (2-) 4 - 17 mm long and 4 mm thick. Flowers ca 23 mm long, sepals 10 - 15 mm long, 7 - 9 mm wide near base, pruinose grayish lavender, curved, ascending, corolla 10 - 15 mm in diameter near the base at broadest point, petals 20 mm long, 6 - 8 mm wide, slightly keeled, pruinose orange-pink outside, curving slightly outwards with an opening of 9 - 10 mm, 5 - 7 mm in diameter at waist, inner surface yellowish. 1. Until its description in 1997 this species has been in cultivation for decades under the name Echeveria subrigida. In fact E. cante and E. subrigida cannot be confused, the leaves of the former are highly farinose (those of E. subrigida are white-pruinose or also entirely green) and its inflorescence is shorter and more branched. 2. Hybrids made prior to 1997 with E. subrigida as one parent therefore are in fact hybrids with E. cante. 3. The plant distributed as E. subrigida by ISI (no.182) in 1958 was not this species, but also E. cante.


Planting

From Early Spring TO Late Winter

Echeveria can be propagated easily by separating pups, but also by leaf cuttings, and by seed. It needs a warm, sunny position with well drained soil to develop their foliage colour. It is recommended to position plants in an area where they are in part shade. This means that they should be in morning sun, or afternoon sun, or both (but shaded during the harsh midday period). Alternatively, plants may be grown under full filtered sun underneath shade cloth which is usually stocked by your local hardware store. 50% filtration is recommended to avoid sunburn but maintain great colour. You may need to test what works well in your particular climate. Most succulents will be grown in containers and pots and they will need good drainage medium. Add coarse grit such as perlite or pumice to soil and repot every year in late-spring. Don't worry about damaging the roots when re-potting as most Echeveria generally tolerate disturbance well.

 

Flowering

From Early Spring TO Late Winter

Echeveria could flower a number of times through the year. Flowering can use much of the plant’s energy, therefore it’s recommended that flower stalks are removed from sick or weaker plants until they are well established. If your plant is healthy, enjoy it’s beautiful show of blooms. Flowers on short stalks (cymes) arise from compact rosettes of succulent's fleshy, often brightly coloured leaves. Species are polycarpic, meaning that they may flower and set seed many times over the course of their lifetimes and indeed a number of times per year.

 

Propagating

From Early Spring TO Late Winter

Pluck a leaf gently from the stem taking care not to damage the leaf. It should have a u-shape if plucked correctly. Leave the leaf for a few days to callous over. Once this has happened, place the leaf on top of your propagation medium of choice with the u-shaped end downward, rest the leaf on a bamboo stick or similar at a 45 degree angle to the propagation medium. Propagation is best done in indirect light, not in direct sunlight. Alternatively, a grow light can be used. Roots should sprout in two to four weeks, followed by new tiny leaves. At this point, depending on the humidity and rainfall in your area, you may mist or lightly water your leaves as the plant grows. Resist the urge to remove the mother leaf once it becomes dried up and shrivelled. It’s best for this process to occur naturally.

 
Subscribe to GardenTags Premium to get personalised planting tasks and more for your entire plant collection
 
Gardeners who are growing this plant