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Tuberous Begonias in the GardenTags plant encyclopedia

Begonia (Tuberous)

 

Tuberous Begonias

Tuberous begonias are grown for their bright colours and long flowering season. They are suited to container growing, and for hanging-baskets. Tuberous begonias are frost-tender, and need to be lifted and over-wintered in a frost-free place, so are often grown as annuals. Sprays of flowers, each bloom up to 3cms. across, are carried on fleshy stems above the handsome coppery foliage from Summer through until Autumn. The plants grow from tubers and produce bulbils in the leaf axils from which they can be propagated. The 'Nonstop®' hybrids and the 'Prima-Donna' series are double flowered. Plants in the 'Pendula' group are similar to the Multifloras except their stems are longer and thinner giving plants a trailing habit suitable for hanging baskets.

 
plant Features
  • Tuberous Begonias likes partial shade

    Partial shade

  • Tuberous Begonias likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

  • Tuberous Begonias is not frost hardy

    Not Frost hardy

  • Tuberous Begonias likes moist and free draining

    Moist and free draining

 
Similar plants are available to buy from 4 store(s) in the UK
 
plant information

Common name

Tuberous Begonias

Latin name

Begonia (Tuberous)

type

Half hardy annual or perennial

family

Begoniaceae

ph

5.5 - 7.5 Acid - Neutral

  • Light

    Tuberous Begonias likes partial shade

    Partial shade

  • Frost

    Tuberous Begonias is not frost hardy

    Not Frost hardy

  • Soil

    Tuberous Begonias likes moist and free draining

    Moist and free draining

  • Water

    Tuberous Begonias likes occasional watering

    Occasional watering

Plant & bloom calendar

  •  
    Best time to plant

full grown dimensions

The size of a fully grown Tuberous Begonias is 0.40meters x 0.60meters 0.40 M 0.60 M

Begonia (Tuberous)

Tuberous begonias are grown for their bright colours and long flowering season. They are suited to container growing, and for hanging-baskets. Tuberous begonias are frost-tender, and need to be lifted and over-wintered in a frost-free place, so are often grown as annuals. Sprays of flowers, each bloom up to 3cms. across, are carried on fleshy stems above the handsome coppery foliage from Summer through until Autumn. The plants grow from tubers and produce bulbils in the leaf axils from which they can be propagated. The 'Nonstop®' hybrids and the 'Prima-Donna' series are double flowered. Plants in the 'Pendula' group are similar to the Multifloras except their stems are longer and thinner giving plants a trailing habit suitable for hanging baskets.


Planting

From Early Spring TO Early Spring

Tubers can be started off from early spring in a heated greenhouse or a month later in a non-heated one. It is very important that a sprout appears before the tuber is planted. If your tubers seem slow to sprout, move them from the cool storage area to a warm dark place. When sprouts appear, the tubers are ready to be planted. Harden off and plant out once risk of frost has passed. It is also possible to plant the tubers directly into their flowering positions in late spring. This results in a later start to flowering. It may take up to three months from planting the tuber to full bloom, so tubers should be started indoors at least a month before the last frost date. Tuberous begonias are native to high altitudes growing conditions in the Andes Mountains. They perform best when grown in a similar environment with high humidity and cool nights. Though they need to be shaded from hot sunlight, they do need some sun to flower best. Morning light or light that is filtered through leaves or a lattice roof is best.

 

Propagating by stem cuttings

From Early Spring TO Mid Spring

Take a 4in (10cm) with a heel (section of tuber) in Spring. Insert in rooting compost, with some bottom heat of 18-21°C (64-70°F).

 

Planting

From Late Spring TO Early Summer

All begonias do best in neutral or slightly acid soils or compost, and most prefer to be sited in partial shade. Some will suffer in the sun. All begonias are frost tender. When first planting young plants, it is worth removing any early flower buds, as this will allow the plant to reach its full size as quickly as possible. Plant out bedding plants when there is no risk of frost. Water in well but as with all begonias, try to keep water away from foliage if possible as although they like to be kept moist, too much water on the foliage can cause mildew and spoil your display.

 

Propagation by seed early

From Mid Winter TO Late Winter

Sow seed in mid to late winter in a propogator and maintain a temperature of 20-25C. Do not cover the seed with compost. Maintain high humidity with a fine water spray. Seeds are like dust so care needs to be taken. As they begin to germinate, protect the seedlings from full direct sunlight and prick out after about six weeks. Begonias are among the more difficult plants to raise from seed. Even gardeners with well heated greenhouses often resort to buying small young plants in early or mid-spring to bring on to planting stage. Harden off before planting out.

 

Propagation by cutting

From Early Summer TO Late Summer

Cuttings may be propagated for additional plants. Divide in spring for more outdoor begonia plants. Cuttings can be done by taking a stem and taking off the lower leaves and making a fresh cut just under the nest leaf, dip into rooting compound and plant in a pot with damp sand to encourage roots, do not let it dry out.

 
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